Page 8, 29th July 1949

29th July 1949
Page 8
Page 8, 29th July 1949 — The Lourdes Cures Are Recognised As Miracles
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The Lourdes Cures Are Recognised As Miracles

Two cures at Lourdes, one in 1938 of a blind, paralysed boy and one in 1947 of a nun suffering from T.B. and cancer, have been recognised by the medical bureau and episcopal authority. The cure of a blind and paralysed four-year-old child, Francis Pascal, has been officially proclaimed by the Bureau of Medical Inquiry at Lourdes. At the same time Mgr. de Provencheres, Archbishop of Aix-enProvence, has declared the cure of a miraculous nature.

The cure of Francis took place in 1938, but the war delayed inquiry into it. Francis was stricken with Meningitis in 1937. It left him blind and paralysed his arms and legs.

In August of 1938, after several baths at Lourdes, his mother ,..sas carrying him away from the pool when he suddenly pointed a finger at a tricycle on the esplanade. He began to see clearly objects that were handed to him. Back home at Beaucaire he learned to walk. His doctors said that his vision was normal and that there was no trace of paralysis.

The doctors made a statement to the canonical commission of Aix, saying that the cure was beyond medical explanation.

The Journal of the Grotto of Lourdes has published a medical report proclaiming the incontestable miraculous cure of a 45-year-old woman, Mme. Rose Martin of Nice. From November, 1945, Mine, Martin had suffered from cancer of the throat. She had been operated on twice without success in February and October, 1946, in a Nice hospital.

On June 30, 1947, Mme. Martin was taken to Lourdes in a very weak physical condition. She was nearly in a coma. She was able to make the trip only because she was given numerous injections of camphor. After her third bath in the pool at Lourdes she stated that she felt a definite improvement in her condi tion. That very evening she was able to get up herself. She felt no On her return to Nice, she was examined by her surgeon who declared that the illness from which she had suffered had disappeared.

A decree of Mgr. Paul Remond, Bishop of Nice, has proclaimed the miraculous character of the cure.




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